Nils thuerey thesis

In a first step, steep wave fronts in the height field are detected and marked by line segments. Unlike previous approaches, our method does not suffer from diffusive surfaces or complex re-meshing operations, and robustly handles topology changes with the use of a meshless representation.

We present a method for accurately tracking the moving surface of deformable materials in a manner that gracefully handles topological changes. Our key finding is that the proximal operator constraining fluid velocities to be divergence-free is directly equivalent to the pressure-projection methods commonly used in incompressible flow solvers.

We replace traditional re-sampling methods with a convex hull method for connecting surface features during topological changes. Motivated by measurements in the free surface turbulence literature, we observe that past certain frequencies, it is sufficient to perform a wave simulation directly on the liquid surface, and construct a reduced-dimensional surface-only simulation.

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We combine each of these elements to produce a simulation algorithm that is capable of creating animations at high maximum resolutions while avoiding common pitfalls like inaccurate boundary conditions and inefficient computation.

Nils Thuerey Thesis

We can create ripples and waves on the fluid surface attracting the surface mesh to the control mesh with spring-like forces and also by running a wave simulation over the surface mesh. The goal of this paper is to enable the interactive simulation of phenomena such as animated fluid characters.

We propose a mesh-based surface tracking method for fluid animation that both preserves fine surface details and robustly adjusts the topology of the surface in the presence of arbitrarily thin features like sheets and strands.

While different techniques to handle these effects were developed in the past years, they require a full 3D fluid solver with free surfaces and surface tension.

We present a shallow water based particle model that is coupled with a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation to demonstrate that real-time simulations of bubble and foam effects are possible with high frame rates.

In addition, we demonstrate a re-sampling scheme to remove surfaces that are hidden inside the bulk volume. The surface clearly shows small-scale turbulent structures which are costly to resolve.

We demonstrate that due to the design of our algorithm it is highly suitable for massively parallel architectures, and is able to generate detailed turbulent simulations with millions of particles at high frame rates.

Although there has been a significant amount of work on turbulence in graphics recently, these algorithms rely on the underlying simulation to resolve the flow around objects.

We can create ripples and waves on the fluid surface attracting the surface mesh to the control mesh with spring-like forces and also by running a wave simulation over the surface mesh.

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Our method can produce highly detailed liquid surfaces with control over sub-grid details by using a mesh-based surface tracker on top of a coarse grid-based fluid simulation.

Our contributions include a new space-time non-rigid iterative closest point algorithm that incorporates user guidance, a subsampling technique for efficient registration of meshes with millions of vertices, and a fast surface extraction algorithm that produces 3D triangle meshes from a 4D space-time surface.

Additionally, this coupled simulation system is able to simulate the internal particle forces in the connections between sintered particles, which could break due to the forces and torques of a shear flow.

We couple this discretization with a spatially adaptive Fluid-Implicit Particle FLIP method, enabling efficient, robust, minimally-dissipative simulations that can undergo sharp changes in spatial resolution while minimizing artifacts. We propose a general formulation of the underlying equations that is tailored towards the use with an Implicit Newmark integrator.

As we offload complexity from the fluid solver to the particle system, we can control the level of detail of the simulation easily by adjusting the particle number, without changing the large-scale behavior. Highlights of our results include a taffy-pulling animation with many fold and merge events, the creation and separation of thin strands in the simulation of viscoelastic materials, and the retention of thin sheets and surface details in a splashing fluid animation.

We precompute the turbulence characteristics around an object, and inject corresponding vorticity during a fluid simulation run, giving regions of confined vorticity. When the sheets impinge on the water surface, they are absorbed and result in the creation of particles representing drops and foam.

// Nils Thuerey, Physically based animation of free surface flows with the lattice Boltzmann method, // PhD thesis, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (). the work on this thesis, it has been integrated into an open source 3D application.

Publications

Finally, areas of future work and possible extensions of the algorithm will be dis-cussed. One of these topics is the inclusion of an accurate and efficient curvature com-putation for surface tension forces. Furthermore, an outlook of possible applications.

// Nils Thuerey, Physically based animation of free surface flows with the lattice Boltzmann method, // PhD thesis, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (). Sebastian Eberhardt, Steffen Weissmann, Ulrich Pinkall, Nils Thuerey Proceedings of the Symposium on Computer Animation (SCA '12); Eurographics/ACM, Project: [WWW].

CURRICULUM VITAE! Nils Thuerey, Ph.D. Boltzmannstr. 3 Garching Germany Employment Education Professional Activities - now Assistant Professor at the Technical University of Munich. ¥ Staedtler Graduation Award for Phd-thesis (highest remunerated award of Uni.

Erlangen). Synthetic Turbulence using Artificial Boundary Layers Tobias Pfaff, Nils Thürey, Andrew Selle and Markus Gross ACM SIGGRAPH Asia Paper []Youtube []Project Page [].

Nils thuerey thesis
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cwiextraction.com You Xie, PhD candidate – Thuerey Group